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Alvie Equine

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Farrier Consultations 

At Alvie Equine we recognize the importance of collaborating with your farrier to achieve the best results for you and your horse. It is often beneficial to discuss lameness issues with your farrier to identify a remedial shoeing approach to improve your horse’s soundness.  We are fortunate in this area to have a number of experienced farriers who are dedicated enough to find time to work with vets to improve your horses shoeing and foot balance.  

 Digital radiographs have been instrumental in assisting vets and farriers know what is best for you horse.  We can meet the farrier at your barn and with digital xrays we have an image immediately, so we can discuss, take measurements and come up with a treatment strategy. We can also repeat the views after shoeing or trimming is complete to ensure we achieved the desired results. This is particularly useful when we have laminitis cases, we can identify rotation, sole depth and position of the coffin bone.

 

 

 In the above image we can identify rotation of the coffin bone. The point of this bone is very close to the sole, we can also view a seroma pocket along the dorsal wall.                  

Hoof Conformation

 

Hoof conformation is another area where working with your farrier can be invaluable to correct current issues and prevent future problems, including coffin joint arthritis. Radiographs can show imbalance both medial and laterally of the lower limb joints by correcting this we can relieve pressure on the joints, ensure correct footfall and maintain soundness. 

 

In this image we can see the left side of the coffin one sits higher than the right side. This hoof has been poorly trimmed resulting in medio-lateral imbalance. You can see how compressed the left side of the coffin joint is compared to the right. You can imagine the damage this imbalance does to the joint when you consider the weight of the horse over that small surface area.

 

 

Long toe — under run heel foot configuration is one of the most important and common foot abnormalities facing the horse industry today.

Long toe — under run heel.
 

 

 

 

 

 

Shoeing Options

Heart Bar Shoe
Heart Bar Shoe
Bar Shoe
Bar Shoe
Egg Bar Shoe + Pad
Egg Bar Shoe + Pad

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These are 3 types of bar shoes, they are used in different circumstances to acheive more support for the hoof. we take each individual horse and design a particular farrier solution for their individual needs.

Examples of radiographs

There are three radiographs in this study that will demonstrate how a foot can change quite dramatically over a 10 month period. The horse has a history of Cushing's Disease and Insulin Resistance and despite attempts to manage these conditions with medications and dietary modifications the patient still had laminitic episodes. Fortunately the outcome has been successful, largely because of the farrier work and our ability to manage this case as a team.

Throughout the radiographs you will see lines drawn to measure distance of the coffin bone relative to the hoof wall and to the sole as well as angles demonstrating displacement of the coffin bone relative to the dorsal hoof wall.

Initial radiograph from November 2007. At this point horse was asymptomatic and had approximately 8 degrees of rotation away from the hoof wall. Ideally the 2 lines that run diagonally across the front of the bone and hoof wall would remain paralell. In addition the distance between the bone and the hoof wall should be approximately 2 cm or less. Increasing beyond this suggests laminar swelling. In an acute case this can be quite uncomfortable, while it may be more manageable from a pain standpoint in a chronic case and this "laminar wedge" can be more of a physical presence that can be resolved later.
Initial radiograph from November 2007. At this point horse was asymptomatic and had approximately 8 degrees of rotation away from the hoof wall. Ideally the 2 lines that run diagonally across the front of the bone and hoof wall would remain paralell. In addition the distance between the bone and the hoof wall should be approximately 2 cm or less. Increasing beyond this suggests laminar swelling. In an acute case this can be quite uncomfortable, while it may be more manageable from a pain standpoint in a chronic case and this "laminar wedge" can be more of a physical presence that can be resolved later.
Second radiograph demonstrating significant changes from previous x-ray. As you can see by the measurements there is an angle of displacement/rotation of about 14 degrees and the distances between the bone and hoof wall have increased significantly. At this point and in the past few months he underwent periods of inreasing amounts of pain which affected his ability to walk and turn corners  comfortably. Besides trimming and shoeing moifications, which brought the "breakover" back while maintaining support, and the use of various medications we were able to manage his condition.
Second radiograph demonstrating significant changes from previous x-ray. As you can see by the measurements there is an angle of displacement/rotation of about 14 degrees and the distances between the bone and hoof wall have increased significantly. At this point and in the past few months he underwent periods of inreasing amounts of pain which affected his ability to walk and turn corners comfortably. Besides trimming and shoeing moifications, which brought the "breakover" back while maintaining support, and the use of various medications we were able to manage his condition.
In this third radiograph you can see the result of the work that was done with him. The amount of displacement is reduced and the angle measures only between 6-7 degrees. He was comfortable at this point, off all medications for pain and able to be ridden again. Of course not every case will be as successful, but without being able to work collaboratively with the farrier I'm sure the outcome would not have been so positive. Being able to monitor this case and using the digital x-rays were essential.
In this third radiograph you can see the result of the work that was done with him. The amount of displacement is reduced and the angle measures only between 6-7 degrees. He was comfortable at this point, off all medications for pain and able to be ridden again. Of course not every case will be as successful, but without being able to work collaboratively with the farrier I'm sure the outcome would not have been so positive. Being able to monitor this case and using the digital x-rays were essential.
 

This radiograph shows the large defect formed in the coffin bone when a keratoma tumour is present behind the hoof wall. This case presented with chronic abcesses of a year duration and required extensive surgery to remove the lesion.